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Ten Bond-film cars that sold for well above the model’s average value


With people set to flock to cinemas to see the latest Bond film, I, we take a look back at cars that have featured in movies and then sold for well above average values. Pictured: Daniel Craig in his final appearance as 007

With folks set to flock to cinemas to see the newest Bond movie, No Time to Die, we have a look again at cars that have featured in motion pictures after which sold for well above average values. Pictured: Daniel Craig in his ultimate look as 007

With the public this weekend set to flock to cinemas throughout the nation to get pleasure from Daniel Craig’s ultimate look as 007 in ‘No Time to Die‘, we thought it was the ideally suited time to have a look again at cars that have appeared in Bond movies after which sold for astonishing quantities of cash.

We’ve teamed up with traditional automotive valuations analysts at Hagerty to check the values of ten real cars used throughout the manufacturing of the well-known Bond franchise that went to the block at a later date.

Historical information means we are able to evaluate the sale value of the Bond-film automotive to the average value of the mannequin at the time the hammer dropped. And it reveals that a starring function in certainly one of the 25 franchise motion pictures can add over 5,000 per cent in value to a automobile. 

Because Hagerty displays and tracks 1000’s of public sale, seller and personal gross sales yearly, it has been in a position to present us with average sale costs for normal cars to check with the large charges paid at public sale for examples that featured in Bond hits.

All sale costs have been transformed utilizing the alternate price for that time, then in contrast information values for these cars that yr. 

Where the sale was earlier than Hagerty’s information started, it arrived at a value via up to date gross sales listings and different valuation sources.

In reverse order, these are the 10 fashions that have commanded the highest premium because of a big-screen look in a Bond blockbuster.

10. 1971 Ford Mustang Mach 1

Bond movie look: Diamonds Are Forever (1971)

Standard value at time of sale: £9,200

This Ford Mustang that featured in 1971 Bond film Diamonds Are Forever failed to sell at auction in 2004, but the top bid was still well above the average value for the American muscle car at the time

This Ford Mustang that featured in 1971 Bond movie Diamonds Are Forever didn’t promote at public sale in 2004, however the prime bid was nonetheless well above the average value for the American muscle automotive at the time

The purple Ford Mustang Mach 1 pushed by Tiffany Case actually grabbed consideration when it roared onto the large display in the 1971 film Diamonds are Forever.

However, it did not set collectors’ pulses racing when it was provided by Barrett-Jackson auctions in 2004. In truth, the hammer didn’t drop for the Mustang as bidding did not attain its sale reserve. A prime bid of $23,000 (£12,650) was as excessive as paddle-raising went.

Despite not altering arms, the prime bid was 37.5 per cent greater than a normal Mach 1 was price at the time. Yet its unsold standing means it’s backside of this listing.

9. 1991 Mercedes-Benz 190E

Bond movie look: No Time To Die (2021)

Standard value at time of sale: £6,500

This supremely-cool 1990s Mercedes-Benz is set to feature in the latest Bond film out this week. However, we don't know how heavily it appears

This supremely-cool Nineties Mercedes-Benz is ready to characteristic in the newest Bond movie out this week. However, we do not know the way closely it seems

Despite being a Nineties Merc, that is the mannequin in our listing that most just lately seems in a Bond movie. In truth, it debuted on the silver display this week. 

It is at present for sale on labeled advert web site Car and Classic. It is a surviving motor from filming of No Time to Die. However, [as we’ve not seen it yet] we’re unaware of how prevalent it’s in the film, with the 190E not even that includes in the trailers. 

Despite its unknown fame ranges, the price ticket positioned on the automotive is almost 40 per cent greater than a normal 1991 Mercedes saloon.

8. 1937 Bentley 4 ¼-Litre Gurney Nutting 3-Position DHC

Bond movie look: Never Say Never Again (1983) 

Standard value at time of sale: £133,300

This Bentley driven by Sean Connery in Never Say Never Again sold in 2004 for £188,500 and again in 2010 for £221,500

This Bentley pushed by Sean Connery in Never Say Never Again sold in 2004 for £188,500 and once more in 2010 for £221,500

Sean Connery as Bond drove this automotive in plenty of scenes in the 1983 Warner Brothers blockbuster Never Say Never Again in 1983.

It sold for £188,500 when it was auctioned by Bonhams in September 2004, but simply six years later returned to the sale room and earned its then vendor a wholesome revenue.

The second time round – once more at a Bonhams sale – it achieved £221,500, which is over two thirds greater than a normal mannequin was price of the time. Hagerty says this particular automotive is kind of the star: not solely did it have the Bond connection, however it additionally appeared in Magnum, P.I. and was a real concours instance, wowing onlookers at Pebble Beach in 2003 following a restoration that reportedly price in extra of $450,000.

7. 1969 Aston Martin DBS-6

Bond movie look: On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969)

Standard value at time of sale: £3,050

This green Aston Martin DBS-6 from On Her Majesty's Secret Service was exported to Australia where it was sold in 1978 for a 182% premium on the usual values at the time. It is still owned by the same individual today

This inexperienced Aston Martin DBS-6 from On Her Majesty’s Secret Service was exported to Australia the place it was sold in 1978 for a 182% premium on the standard values at the time. It remains to be owned by the identical particular person right this moment

James Bond has solely been married as soon as, and this was his marriage ceremony automotive of selection. Used in plenty of scenes in the 1969 film On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, the inexperienced six-cylinder Aston Martin DBS was exported to Australia after filming ended and was final sold in 1978 to the present proprietor, Sigi Zidziunas.

He who advised ABC News in Australia: ‘It was marketed in the paper as an ex-film automotive, however I did not imagine it, as a result of — no offence — who believes used automotive salesmen?’

Even then, it was costly. Advertised at $14,950 AUD, Zidziunas paid a sum of $14,200 in ’78 – the equal of £8,991. Standard cars in good situation had been then price £3,050 based on up to date guides: that’s a 182 per cent premium.

6. 2008 Aston Martin DBS V12

Bond movie look: Quantum of Solace (2008)

Standard value at time of sale: £70,000

This is one of seven Aston Martin DBS cars used in the filming of 2008 film, Quantum of Solace - and fortunately isn't one of the two to be totally trashed during the opening sequence of the movie

This is certainly one of seven Aston Martin DBS cars utilized in the filming of 2008 movie, Quantum of Solace – and thankfully is not certainly one of the two to be completely trashed throughout the opening sequence of the film

Driven by Daniel Craig in Quantum of Solace, this 2008 Aston Martin DBS was certainly one of seven used for filming – although not certainly one of two that had been trashed throughout the movie’s opening sequence with Bond being pursued by two chasing Alfa Romeo 159s. 

Described as a ‘collector’s merchandise’ by the promoting public sale home, Christie’s, it warned potential consumers that they had been accountable for ‘all exams and repairs and another legally required formalities’ to show it again right into a highway automotive. 

The warning did little to discourage Aston Martin followers and Bond fanatics who tussled to to put up a profitable bid. It finally smashed its prime pre-sale estimate of £150,000, promoting for £241,250 – some 245 per cent above what a normal automotive was price at the time.

5. 1969 Mercury Cougar XR7

Bond movie look: On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969)

Standard value at time of sale: £55,500

This is one of the four Mercury Cougars driven by The Contessa Teresa Di Vicenzo - also known as Tracy Bond - in the 1969 film On her Majesty's Secret Service

This is certainly one of the 4 Mercury Cougars pushed by The Contessa Teresa Di Vicenzo – often known as Tracy Bond – in the 1969 movie On her Majesty’s Secret Service

The Contessa Teresa Di Vicenzo, often known as Tracy Bond, drove a surprising automotive all through the 1969 film On Her Majesty’s Secret Service together with the first scene which it shared with the Aston Martin DBS-6 described above. 

One of a reported 4 Mercury Cougars used for filming was just lately provided at the Bonhams Bond Street Sale in London on 16 December 2020. It – fitted with its ski rack and skis – sold for a large £365,500, which was well above the pre-sale estimate of £100,000 to £150,000. 

It was additionally an enormous 559 per cent greater than the average normal value for the mannequin a yr in the past.

4. 1965 Aston Martin DB5

Bond movie look: Goldfinger (1964) and Thunderball (1965)

Standard value at time of sale: £616,550

The DB5 from Goldfinger and Thunderball is the most expensive film car to ever go under the hammer, with a sale price of more than £4.5million

The DB5 from Goldfinger and Thunderball is the costliest movie automotive to ever go below the hammer, with a sale value of greater than £4.5million

Billed as the ‘most well-known automotive in the world’ when provided for public sale in 2019 by RM Sotheby’s, this was the actual deal: certainly one of two cars bought by Eon Productions for the launch of Thunderball however then transformed to ‘Q Branch’ specification for its look in Goldfinger a yr earlier.

It sold simply over its prime estimate for $6.38million, which at the time was £4.67million in British kilos. It confirmed a mark-up of 759 per cent over the value of a ‘normal’ DB5 at the time. 

In this case, provenance was every part: the same DB5 that has been used as a stunt automotive in the filming of Golden Eye was sold by Bonhams the earlier yr, however it ‘solely’ made £1,961,500, simply over thrice the value of a normal mannequin.

3. 2014 Land Rover Defender 110 Double Cab SVX

Bond movie look: Spectre (2015) 

Standard value at time of sale: £35,200

One of a section of specially-converted Land Rover Defenders from 2015 film Spectre was sold at auction in 2015, around the time the iconic 4X4 went out of production

One of a bit of specially-converted Land Rover Defenders from 2015 movie Spectre was sold at public sale in 2015, round the time the iconic 4X4 went out of manufacturing

RM Sotheby’s sold certainly one of a collection of particular Bond SVX Defender 110s that featured in the chase scene of 2015 movie Spectre for £230,000. The following July a second instance was taken to the block and hit a whopping £365,000. 

The timing of the sale performed an enormous half in the extremely excessive sale value. Production of the authentic Defender had led to 2016. However, in 2018 Jaguar Land Rover commissioned a brief run of seventieth Anniversary specials, sending demand for the mannequin sky-high. 

The value of the Bonhams instance was practically 940 per cent greater than a normal 110 Defender – and it is as cool as the frozen Austrian panorama the place it was used to chase down Daniel Craig as 007 in a crashing airplane.

2. 1974 AMC Hornet

Bond movie look: The Man With The Golden Gun (1974)

Standard value at time of sale: £5,200

This is the stunt car used for the corkscrew jump in the iconic James Bond scene in the 1974 film The Man With the Golden Gun. It sold at a US auction in 2017 for almost £90,000

This is the stunt automotive used for the corkscrew soar in the iconic James Bond scene in the 1974 movie The Man With the Golden Gun. It sold at a US public sale in 2017 for virtually £90,000

Ask any Bond nut to call the franchise’s greatest stunt and the corkscrew ‘Astro Spiral’ soar in the Roger Moore 1974 film The Man with the Golden Gun shall be proper at the prime of the listing. 

The American-made automotive used was an unlikely hero by 007 requirements. In truth, the AMC Hornet remains to be thought of so mundane that even the US Hagerty Price Guide would not deem it worthy of inclusion of its common valuation evaluation. 

But the real automotive utilized in filming was very particular – and very wanted. Having been maintained precisely because it was throughout filming, it sold at RM Sotheby’s Auburn, Indiana sale in 2017 for $110,000 (£89,105) – in extra of 1,600 per cent over the value of a normal automotive.

1. 1977 Lotus Esprit S1 ‘Wet Nellie’

Bond movie look: The Spy Who Love Me (1977)

Standard value at time of sale: £12,300

The Lotus – which was bought at the sale by Elon Musk – was actually a film prop submarine used just in underwater scenes, and it doesn't even have wheels. Still, it tops our list

The Lotus – which was purchased at the sale by Elon Musk – was really a movie prop submarine used simply in underwater scenes, and it would not even have wheels. Still, it tops our listing

The most useful Bond automotive when in comparison with a normal model’s value is that this 1977 Lotus Esprit S1, higher often called ‘Wet Nellie’, that starred in the 1977 film The Spy Who Loved Me

It sold at RM Sotheby’s 2013 London auction for £616,000, an enormous 4,908 per cent mark-up over the normal Hagerty Price Guide value of the mannequin at the time. 

Lost after filming, it was rediscovered in a New York storage container in 1989, having been sold for a mere $100 in a blind public sale to the subsequent fortunate house owners.

The iconic Bond Lotus – which was really purchased at the Sotheby’s sale by Elon Musk – wasn’t even a automotive. It was a movie prop submarine used simply in underwater scenes. In truth, it would not even have wheels, regardless of the movie’s footage displaying the 4 corners retracting into the bodywork. Still, regardless of not being drivable on roads, it tops the listing of motors right here.

*sold for values based mostly on marketed value or highest bid for an unsold lot 

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